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The MFF Podcast #308: Role Models, Venti Coffees, and KISS

September 27, 2020

You can download or stream the pod on Apple PodcastsTune In,  Podbean, or Spreaker (or wherever you listen to podcasts…..we’re almost everywhere).

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

Mark and Chris Kelly (of the Classic American Movies podcast) discuss the 2008 film Role Models. Directed by David Wain, and starring Seann William Scott, Elizabeth Banks, and the immortal Paul Rudd, this popular comedy is a lot of fun, and loaded with pretty much every comedic actor you like. In this episode, we discuss energy drinks, Jane Lynch, and 2008 comedies. Enjoy!

If you are a fan of the podcast, make sure to send in some random listener questions so we can do our best to not answer them correctly. We thank you for listening, and hope you enjoy the episode!

You can download the pod on Apple PodcastsTune In,  Podbean, or Spreaker.

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

Deep Blue Sea – The Podcast – Episode 12 – Juicy Explosions, Helicopter Destruction, and the Geography of the Aquatica

September 24, 2020

You can listen to Deep Blue Sea – The Podcast on Apple Podcasts, SpreakerSpotify, Tunein, Podcast Addict, Google Podcasts, and everywhere else you listen to podcasts. Also, make sure to like our Facebook page!

Please make sure to rate, review, share, and subscribe! Thanks!

Jay and Mark are joined by Will Slater (of the Exploding Helicopter Podcast) to discuss “Crash and Burn,” the 12th chapter on the Deep Blue Sea DVD. In this episode, they discuss juicy explosions, exploding helicopters, and the geography of the Aquatica

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Make sure to follow Exploding Helicopter on Twitter (@chopperfireball), Facebook, and Instagram.

The MFF Podcast #307: The Warriors, Soda Bottles, and Running

September 23, 2020

You can download the pod on Apple PodcastsTune In,  Podbean, or Spreaker (or wherever you listen to podcasts…..we’re almost everywhere).

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

The MFF podcast is back, and this week we’re talking about the badasss 1979 cult classic The Warriors. We love this film, and think director Walter Hill did an excellent job creating a gritty, grimy, and sweaty world full of running, fighting and memorable characters. The producers made the wise (and dumb) decision to shoot on location, and the 1970’s New York City streets add a level of realism that still feels real and dangerous today. In this episode, we discuss movie fights, running, and the cult classics of the 1970s.

If you are a fan of the podcast, make sure to send in some random listener questions so we can do our best to not answer them correctly. We thank you for listening, and hope you enjoy the episode!

You can download the pod on Apple PodcastsTune In,  Podbean, or Spreaker.

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

John’s Horror Corner: Beyond Re-Animator (2003), the weakest of the trilogy, but still a goretastic bonkers blast.

September 20, 2020

MY CALL: Let’s be honest. This film is weak when compared to its two predecessors (in terms of story, characters and execution). However, this is loads of zany, gory, slapstick fun and I was glad to see the story of Dr. Herbert West advanced in any manner I could get it. MORE MOVIES LIKE Bride of Re-Animator: After you’ve seen parts 1 and 2 (1985, 1990), I’d recommend any of Brian Yuzna’s other gory fair (e.g., Society, Necronomicon: Book of the Dead, Faust: Love of the Damned, Return of the Living Dead III).

MORE LOVECRAFTIAN HORROR MOVIES:  For more Lovecraftian adaptations, try Screamers (1979; aka Island of the Fishmen, Something Waits in the Dark and L’isola degli uomini pesce), Re-Animator (1985), Bride of Re-Animator (1990), From Beyond (1986), The Unnamable (1988), The Unnamable 2: The Statement of Randolph Carter (1992), The Resurrected (1991), Necronomicon: Book of the Dead (1993), Lurking Fear (1994), Dagon (2001), Dreams in the Witch-House (2005), Color Out of Space (2019) and The Dunwich Horror (1970). And although not specifically of Lovecraftian origins, his influence is most palpable in Prince of Darkness (1987), In the Mouth of Madness (1994), The Void (2016), The Shrine (2010), Baskin (2015) and Cold Skin (2017)—most of which are on the more gruesome side to varying degrees.

This sequel begins with an outrageously mangled zombie and perhaps the most disturbing milk drinking scene in film history (right up there with Terminator 2: Judgment Day). Having witnessed the death of his teenage sister at the hands of one of Herbert West’s (Jeffrey Combs; Necronomicon: Book of the Dead, Re-Animator, Would You RatherThe FrightenersLurking FearCellar Dweller) milk-gargling miscreations, Howard (Jason Barry; Mirrormask) grows up with aspirations to learn from the mad scientist himself. After finishing medical school, Howard becomes the physician at the prison that has held West for 13 years.

Howard’s first day is eventful. He meets a megalomaniac of a warden (Simón Andreu; Die Another Day), his personal idol who happens to have indirectly killed his sister, an attractive young reporter Laura (Elsa Pataky; Fast Five, Fast & Furious 6, Furious 7, The Fate of the Furious) who instantly falls for him, and an ailing inmate who becomes his first re-animation gone-horribly-wrong.

And as we’ve seen in the past two movies, West insists he can reanimate the dead without making murderous rage zombies out of them. Only now there’s a twist to his work. First you reanimate them, then you need to transfer “nanoplasm” from a donor. Sounds legit, right? Well, sure. But that creates some mind-swapping shenanigans that result in a fellatio-severed phallus (a gag that persists much longer than one would expect, but for the better), a rat’s personality is placed in a man, and a sadistic man’s personality is placed in an attractive woman. It gets weird.

This feels comparably goretastic to its predecessors even if lacking some of that gory 80s charm. However, this is still rich with blood and ooey-gooey flesh-tearing bites. The gore is satisfyingly gross. We see chunks of forearms and ears get torn from their bodies. And in the finale the gore is accompanied by total insanity. Like really, we reach a level of slapstick new to the franchise. Oh, and stay turned for a great mid-credit “fight scene” that will warm your cockles. Director Brian Yuzna (Society, Bride of Re-Animator, Necronomicon: Book of the Dead, Faust, Return of the Living Dead III) clearly had some fun with this one.

Overall this sequel is a lot of fun and I enjoy the occasional rewatch. It pales to its predecessors. But it’s not without its high-caliber campy charm. If you’re still on the fence, here’s your decision-making tie-breaker: a rat actually “fights” a reanimated severed penis in the end and the scene is longer than you’d expect.

John’s Horror Corner: Night of the Comet (1984), this character-driven cult classic is among the earliest of the zombedy subgenre.

September 18, 2020

MY CALL: This low budget, early-era zombedy is really something. The incredibly satisfying characters and world-building completely compensate for minimal action and gore. Also, and don’t quote me on this, but this may be the first zombedy (since 1981’s The Evil Dead lacked the slapstick candor of Evil Dead 2). MOVIES LIKE Night of the Comet: Looking for more funny yet still gory zombie movies (i.e., zombedies) of the 80s? Try Re-Animator (1985), Return of the Living Dead (1985), Night of the Creeps (1986) and Dead Alive (1992).

Check out MFF Podcast #284: Night of the Comet, Red Dust and Zombies for a more in-depth discussion of the film.

The world is agog over an imminent astronomical event—the observation of a passing comet. And I am agog with the child-stepparent insubordination, disrespect and assault going on in our star characters’ household. Apparently, Regina (Catherine Mary Stewart; The Girl Next Door, Nightflyers) and her kid sister Samantha (Kelli Maroney; Chopping Mall, Not of this Earth) aren’t terribly fond of their stepmother Doris (Sharon Farrell; It’s Alive, Arcade, The Premonition) and her obvious infidelity. In fact, this movie has a lot to say about indiscriminate sexual proclivities; some more healthy than others.

But back to this comet. It comes and goes, and leaves its billions of human observers reduced to red dust and piles of empty clothes in the city streets. Well, not all of them. Some of them have become zombie-ish monstrosities. I mean, they look like zombies, have no qualms about killing anyone and eat human flesh. But they also talk and use tools quite effectively. Maybe they’re in the turning process…?

Shots of empty city streets aglow with a hazy red sky ominously bring Regina to the jarring realization that something strange has happened. At first, they are shaken by their worldly loss and take out frustrations on each other. But they’re all they have, and they do what they can to embrace that by talking things out, venting over outdoor target practice with automatic weapons, and post-apocalyptic shopping spree dance montages to Girls Just Want to Have Fun. For a zombie apocalypse movie, it’s quite uplifting. Writer/director Thom Eberhardt (Sole Survivor, Captain Ron) really served horror fans well here.

The zombie effects are adequate. What little there is, is actually pretty decent. It’s just very limited by the budget. But this movie still works surprisingly well, and the grimy bloody zombie cop scene makes up for a lot. When zombies are on the screen, they really go for it.

As Regina, Samantha and another survivor Hector take stock of what has become of their world, a group of scientists led by Dr. Carter (Geoffrey Lewis; Double Impact, The Lawnmower Man, The Devil’s Rejects) and his colleague Audrey (Mary Woronov; Warlock, The House of the Devil, Chopping Mall) seeks to accumulate survivors. Being that they are scientists in an 80s apocalypse movie, their motives are questionable.

All said, there’s truly not much action in this, and few zombie attacks. But the characters, writing, sets and cinematography still succeed in building this world and these characters alone are more than enough for me to like it anyway. This film is really much better than I realized when I saw it as a teenager (in the early-mid ‘90s).

The MFF Podcast #306: Dick Tracy, Madonna, and Insane PG-Rated Movies

September 18, 2020

You can download the pod on Apple PodcastsTune In,  Podbean, or Spreaker (or wherever you listen to podcasts…..we’re almost everywhere).

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

The MFF podcast is back, and this week we’re talking about the 1990 blockbuster Dick Tracy. Directed by Warren Beatty, and starring Warren Beatty (again), Madonna, Al Pacino, Dustin Hoffman and Glenne Headly, this PG-rated (which is insane) film was marketed as a summer blockbuster, but plays more like an old-school crime noir that features excellent production design. In this episode, we discuss color palettes, swimming with fishes, and comic book movies. Enjoy!

If you are a fan of the podcast, make sure to send in some random listener questions so we can do our best to not answer them correctly. We thank you for listening, and hope you enjoy the episode!

You can download the pod on Apple PodcastsTune In,  Podbean, or Spreaker.

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

Deep Blue Sea – The Podcast – Chapter 11 – Jet Skis, Prequels, and Deep Blue Me

September 17, 2020

You can listen to Deep Blue Sea – The Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spreaker, Spotify, Tunein, Podcast Addict, Google Podcasts, and everywhere else you listen to podcasts. Also, make sure to like our Facebook page!

Please make sure to rate, review, share, and subscribe! Thanks!

Jay and Mark are joined by Victor Dandridge Jr. ( AKA – The Hardest Working Man in Comics – @VantageInhouse) to discuss “Untimely Jam,” the 11th chapter on the Deep Blue Sea DVD. In this episode, they discuss jet ski action scenes, Deep Blue Sea sequels, and movie waves. Enjoy!

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Follow Victor too!
vantageinhouse.blogspot.com
@VantageInhouse – Twitter

The MFF Podcast #305: The Villainess, Kitchen Fights, and Movie Henchmen

September 14, 2020

You can download the pod on Apple PodcastsTune In,  Podbean, or Spreaker (or wherever you listen to podcasts…..we’re almost everywhere).

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

The MFF podcast is back, and this week we’re talking about the excellent 2017 action film The Villainess. Directed by Jung Byung-gil, and starring Kim Ok-bin (Thirst – excellent film), this bloody-and-brutal Korean action film focuses on a badass assassin looking for revenge (and finding it). It’s a wonderfully unique film that features first-person shooter action scenes, motorcycle chases, and an insane amount of henchmen being horribly murdered. In this episode, we discuss Korean action films, kitchen fights, and movie henchmen.

John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum drew inspiration from this scene.

If you are a fan of the podcast, make sure to send in some random listener questions so we can do our best to not answer them correctly. We thank you for listening, and hope you enjoy the episode!

You can download the pod on Apple PodcastsTune In,  Podbean, or Spreaker.

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

You Cannot Kill David Arquette: A Fun Documentary About Redemption, Wrestling, and Fake Tans

September 12, 2020

I remember back in 2000 when the movie Ready to Rumble was being unleashed into theaters, and David Arquette became the WCW World Heavyweight Championship during the promotional push for the film. By winning the coveted championship, he joined the elite ranks of wrestlers such as Ric Flair, Hulk Hogan, Goldberg and Sting. The wrestling world was pissed off about it, wrestling fans were pissed off about it, and a year later, WCW folded into WWE, and the rest is history. To Arquette’s credit, when he won the championship, the WCW was losing viewers to the WWE, and they were doing everything they could to gain (or keep) viewers, and remain relevant. So, it’s not his fault that the WCW went under, he’s just been used as a scapegoat for it’s ending.

Jump roughly 19 years in the future, and Arquette is still hated by fans, and treated as a pariah by wrestlers who still don’t like him. That’s why at the age of 48, while recovering from an honest-to-goodness heart attack, he attempts a wrestling comeback by traveling to Mexico, taking part in “death matches,” and building a legit ring in his backyard. His quest for respect is genuinely inspiring as he loses 50 pounds, develops his wrestling persona and becomes a legitimate athlete who can fly around with the best of them. It’s as if one day he got tired of being an outcast (by partially his own fault), and decided to get right, and gain some respect – and I really respect that.

Directors Price James and David Darg do an excellent job of combining theatricality with a fly-on-the-wall aesthetic, and I love how Arquette wasn’t afraid to show himself fail, or fall back into old habits. There are moments in this documentary that will make you cringe (his first backyard wrestling match), and five minutes later make you smile (seeing his daughter’s proud reaction to his wrestling), which creates an exhausting and exhilarating experience. In the end, it’s really easy to cheer for Arquette, and you most certainly will, as he’s able to lay some demons to rest by gaining respect.

You Cannot Kill David Arquette is an excellent documentary, and I recommend it to anyone who loves a good comeback tale.

Deep Blue Sea – The Podcast – Chapter 10: Hot Rod Wetsuits, Sliding Competitions, and Hangry Sharks

September 10, 2020

You can listen to Deep Blue Sea – The Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spreaker, Spotify, Tunein, Podcast Addict, Google Podcasts, and everywhere else you listen to podcasts. Also, make sure to like our Facebook page!

Please make sure to rate, review, share, and subscribe! Thanks!

Jay and Mark are joined by Heather Baxendale (@Heather_Kenobi – The MILFcast) to discuss “Whitlock’s Accident,” the 10th chapter of the Deep Blue Sea DVD. This is the chapter in which Jim Whitlock (Stellan Skarsgard) gets his arm bit off by an opportunistic shark (It’s amazing). In this episode, they discuss hangry sharks, scuba doctors, and hot rod wetsuits. Enjoy!

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