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Deep Blue Sea – The Podcast – Episode 14: Uber Sharks, Lazy Rivers, and Horizontal Sliding

October 8, 2020

You can listen to Deep Blue Sea – The Podcast on Apple Podcasts, SpreakerSpotify, Tunein, Podcast Addict, Google Podcasts, and everywhere else you listen to podcasts. Also, make sure to like our Facebook page!

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Jay and Mark are joined by the incredibly funny Lisa Leaheey (Twitter – @LisaPas220) to discuss “Raging Waters,” the 14th chapter on the Deep Blue Sea DVD. In this episode, they discuss lazy rivers, horizontal sliding, and “You Are Here” lights. Enjoy!

Please rate, review, share and subscribe!

Make sure to follow Lisa on Twitter – @LisaPas220

John’s Horror Corner: Graveyard Shift (1990), Stephen King’s gory, slimy, 80s creature feature is a monstrous good time that really holds up.

October 7, 2020

MY CALL: What a surprisingly fun and gory monster movie this turned out to be. This movie held up so much better than I could have imagined. There’s nothing prosaic going on here, just a well-made straightforward slimy monster movie… and for that, I love it. MOVIES LIKE Graveyard Shift: For more movie adaptations based on Stephen King’s books and other work, try the original TV mini-series of Stephen King’s It (1990), It (2017), Creepshow (1982), Cujo (1983), Needful Things (1993), The Night Flier (1997), Gerald’s Game (2017) or Pet Sematary (1989, 2019), to name a few.  

This Stephen King classic has a strong cold open. This first death scene had some personality to supplement its desired mystery (i.e., the off-screen death). Considering we see very little of our killer, it was still very satisfying and tactfully executed. Also rather cheeky considering the victim dies after spending 5 minutes basically lecturing an audience of basement rats.

The old textile mill in a small Maine town has a flooded basement, decades of debris, an alarming rat infestation, and poses a significant health and safety risk to any who enter. Desperate to pass a safety inspection, the shady manager of the mill bribes the safety inspector to buy some time and forms a graveyard shift clean-up crew (including Andrew Divoff; Wishmaster 1-2, Lost, Faust: Love of the Damned). He also hires a very enthusiastic exterminator (Brad Dourif; The Hazing, Child’s Play, Curse of Chucky, Cult of Chucky).

Not long after, a second accident steals away another employee complete with some monstrous creature effects. The monster effects are pretty great considering we never see much at once. The realistic eyes, the big wings and claws, the gaping wet esophagus when its mouth is open. As deaths progress, we also enjoy some dismemberment and a shredded beef-flinging bloody stump. We come to discover that the creature wanders a network of mines under the mill which connect to catacombs of the neighboring cemetery.

By the end, the textile workers have turned against each other and are making short work of each other as the monster patiently picks them off. Somehow, the monster always seems to be where it needs to be throughout this labyrinth of forgotten mines. I was beginning to expect there were a lot of creatures.

The cavernous lair and its sea of bones was an awesome sight. But, oh my, when we finally truly see the monster… it’s a slimy gross animatronic delight! A lot of care went into this beast. Its ear twitches, mouth movements and the way it articulates its slimy claws give it life. And while I love this thing’s appearance, why the heck does it look like its completely covered in snot? The thing appears to be a giant bat… with a prehensile rat tail. We get to see quite a lot of this gloriously disgusting monster. If I’m being honest, it’s pretty great and well worth the wait. Plus, it comes to a super chunky gory end.

For his only feature film ever, director Ralph S. Singleton did a great job. I really enjoyed this movie. The story is very linear, easy to follow, but still very satisfying.

Overall this was actually considerably better-paced, gorier and more exciting than I had remembered (having last seen this in the 90s). The monster looks great and it all really holds up!

The MFF Podcast #312: The Mummy (2017), Running, and Dark Universes

October 7, 2020

You can download or stream the pod on Apple PodcastsTune In,  Podbean, or Spreaker (or wherever you listen to podcasts…..we’re almost everywhere).

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

The MFF podcast is back, and this week we were joined by David Cross (of the Award Wieners Movie Review Podcast) to discuss the 2017 film The Mummy. It’s the third film we’ve covered in our Universal Monster series (listen to The Mummy (1999) and The Wolfman (2010) now!), and we had a fun time discussing this action-horror film that tanked with critics, but still has its charms and fun moments. In this episode, we discuss sandstorms, running, and expansive world building. Enjoy!

There are some very fun moments in this movie.

If you are a fan of the podcast, make sure to send in some random listener questions so we can do our best to not answer them correctly. We thank you for listening, and hope you enjoy the episode!

You can download the pod on Apple PodcastsTune In,  Podbean, or Spreaker.

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

The MFF Podcast #311: A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors

October 5, 2020

You can download or stream the pod on Apple PodcastsTune In,  Podbean, or Spreaker (or wherever you listen to podcasts…..we’re almost everywhere).

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

The MFF Podcast is back, and this week we’re kicking off a new series by talking about the 1987 horror classic A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: The Dream Warriors. Directed by Chuck Russell, and starring Heather Langenkamp, Patricia Arquette and Robert Englund, this excellent film is one of the best horror sequels ever made, and it leads into a neat trilogy of NOES films that we’ll be covering in upcoming episodes. In this episode, we discuss gnarly kills, Freddy’s mythology, and dream powers. Enjoy!

Such a gnarly scene.

If you are a fan of the podcast, make sure to send in some random listener questions so we can do our best to not answer them correctly. We thank you for listening, and hope you enjoy the episode!

You can download the pod on Apple PodcastsTune In,  Podbean, or Spreaker.

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

John’s Horror Corner: Seeding of a Ghost (1983; aka Zhong gui), a Chinese horror-fantasy revenge movie about sorcery, a sex ghost and a revenge baby.

October 3, 2020

MY CALL: After an unexpected sexy crime thriller opening (and middle), this eventually mutates into something disgusting, exploitative and utterly ridiculous. To be clear, I liked it. Sure, it starts slow. But it reaches full-tilt bonkers by the end. MOVIES LIKE Seeding of a Ghost: If it’s Chinese sorcerers you want, then look no further than this James Hong double feature: The Vineyard (1989) and Big Trouble in Little China (1986). For more dark sorcery, try Viy: Forbidden Empire (2014), Mystics in Bali (1981), The Devil’s Sword (1984), Conquest (1983), Black Magic (1975), Black Magic 2 (1976), The Boxer’s Omen (1983), Devil Fetus (1983), Devil Fetus 2 (1984) and Thinner (1996).

Shortly after Hong Kong taxi driver Zhou (Phillip Ko; The Boxer’s Omen) hits a scrappy sorcerer (Hussein Abu Hassan; Centipede Horror) with his car, his wife Irene (Maria Jo; Lethal Panther) goes from thoughtful, loyal and affectionate to a sultry adulteress giving in to Ming’s (Norman Chu; Black Magic, The Web of Death) advances at her workplace. Irene is subsequently raped and murdered by two young criminals. Seeking the sorcerer who was the cause of his curse upon his life, Zhou begs for help at any cost to turn the curse to his enemies. That’s the premise. And while it may sound straightforward, director Kuen Yeung (aka, Chuan Yang; Ghost’s Lover) had some interesting ideas as to how to bring this story to life on screen. And few of these ideas are… classy.

For example, this film features what could only be described as the absolute longest slow-motion topless running scene in cinema history. It’s like the filmmakers wanted to give your mother or spouse every possible opportunity to walk in on you while watching this scene. Even clothed in bathing suits, Baywatch doubtfully ever featured such a lengthy and breasty slow-motion run on the beach. And, now that we’re on the topic, there’s quite a bit of nudity, feisty bedroom flirting and sex (and sexual assault) scenes in this movie. You’d think you were watching a sexy thriller movie; something you’d find showing on the Hong Kong CINEMAX channel after midnight.

After Irene is raped and murdered, the movie shifts into an action-crime thriller loaded with police interrogations and long street fights. There’s street brawling martial arts and everything is told with a straight face. It’s as if a completely new director was telling the middle of this movie’s story in a completely different genre.

Then we shift into the third act when Zhou pleas with the sorcerer who created all of his bad luck and the sorcerer offers to lead the ghost of his murdered wife to her killers. It’s not until this point that Chinese mysticism and black magic run amok as the sorcerer conjures her naked mummified remains and slowly turns them into something more zombie-ish and deliciously gross. Now this is the movie I’ve been waiting to see.

This vengeful black magic is quirky. Starting off rather weak, it induces the vomiting of worms, various hallucinations, and irritable bathroom plumbing. But it soon graduates to possessing naked wives and incestuous siblings to exact Irene’s dirty work from the grave. I’ve gotta’ say it again, there’s a lot of nudity. And now for a sentence I never thought I’d write… Eventually Irene’s spirit (i.e., her mummy-zombie body) has spectral sex with her victim’s ghost and becomes pregnant with a spirit of vengeance. It’s… weird.  And it gets weirder.

So after impregnating Irene’s corpse, the revenge baby subsequently forms in the belly of Ming’s recently possessed and exorcised wife, from whose full-term stomach EXPLODES a gory pulsating glob in a horrific birth scene. As if inspired by The Thing (1982), it forms a mass of malformed bloody tissue, teeth and lashing tentacles and attacks Ming’s guests, who had arrived to enjoy a Couples Game Night. A human head even emerges from this aberration’s mouth and “projectile bites” like the inner mouth of an Alien (1979) xenomorph.

Nice little surprise. After this monster is finally killed… the movie just ends. Like, freeze frame on the dead monster, and cue the credits.

After an unexpected sexy crime thriller opening, this mutated into something grossly satisfying and utterly ridiculous. The corpse, monster and gore effects were all ambitious, impressive (on a budget) and very disgusting. Sure, it takes a while to rev up. But once it does, it’s full-tilt bonkers and well worth the wait.

The MFF Podcast #310: Starship Troopers, Exploding Bugs, and Paul Verhoeven

October 2, 2020

You can download or stream the pod on Apple PodcastsTune In,  Podbean, or Spreaker (or wherever you listen to podcasts…..we’re almost everywhere).

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

The MFF podcast is back, and this week we’re talking about the underappreciated 1997 film Starship Troopers. Directed by Paul Verhoeven, and starring Casper Van Dien, Denise Richards, Dina Meyer and Jake Busey, this $100 million budgeted action film features a heaping dose of satire, violence and more violence. In this episode, we discuss exploding bugs, cheeky fascism, and brain bugs. Enjoy!

If you are a fan of the podcast, make sure to send in some random listener questions so we can do our best to not answer them correctly. We thank you for listening, and hope you enjoy the episode!

You can download the pod on Apple PodcastsTune In,  Podbean, or Spreaker.

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

Deep Blue Sea – The Podcast – Episode 13: Shark Heists, Fin Baseball, and Carter Blake’s Shoes

September 30, 2020

You can listen to Deep Blue Sea – The Podcast on Apple Podcasts, SpreakerSpotify, Tunein, Podcast Addict, Google Podcasts, and everywhere else you listen to podcasts. Also, make sure to like our Facebook page!

Please make sure to rate, review, share, and subscribe! Thanks!

Jay and Mark and joined by Aaron Neuwirth (@AaronPS4 on Twitter – The Out Now With Aaron and Abe podcast), to discuss “Crack in the Window,” the 13th chapter on the Deep Blue Sea DVD. It’s the epic chapter in which the smartest shark alive uses a gurney (with a man named Jim attached to it) to smash a gigantic window (it’s amazing). In this episode, they discuss shark baseball, Ocean’s 3, and prolonged movie deaths. Enjoy!

Please rate, review, share and subscribe!

Make sure to follow Aaron on Twitter – AaronPS4

The MFF Podcast #309: Hard Boiled, Doves, and John Woo

September 30, 2020

You can download or stream the pod on Apple PodcastsTune In,  Podbean, or Spreaker (or wherever you listen to podcasts…..we’re almost everywhere).

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

The MFF podcast is back, and this week we’re talking about the 1992 action classic Hard Boiled. Directed by John Woo (The Killer, Face/Off) and starring Chow Yun-fat and Tony Leung Chiu-wai, this action epic proved itself to be highly influential with its operatic action and ballet-esque action scenes. In this episode, they discuss insane gun battles, John Woo’s career, and action classics. Enjoy!

If you are a fan of the podcast, make sure to send in some random listener questions so we can do our best to not answer them correctly. We thank you for listening, and hope you enjoy the episode!

You can download the pod on Apple PodcastsTune In,  Podbean, or Spreaker.

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

The MFF Podcast #308: Role Models, Venti Coffees, and KISS

September 27, 2020

You can download or stream the pod on Apple PodcastsTune In,  Podbean, or Spreaker (or wherever you listen to podcasts…..we’re almost everywhere).

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

Mark and Chris Kelly (of the Classic American Movies podcast) discuss the 2008 film Role Models. Directed by David Wain, and starring Seann William Scott, Elizabeth Banks, and the immortal Paul Rudd, this popular comedy is a lot of fun, and loaded with pretty much every comedic actor you like. In this episode, we discuss energy drinks, Jane Lynch, and 2008 comedies. Enjoy!

If you are a fan of the podcast, make sure to send in some random listener questions so we can do our best to not answer them correctly. We thank you for listening, and hope you enjoy the episode!

You can download the pod on Apple PodcastsTune In,  Podbean, or Spreaker.

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

Deep Blue Sea – The Podcast – Episode 12 – Juicy Explosions, Helicopter Destruction, and the Geography of the Aquatica

September 24, 2020

You can listen to Deep Blue Sea – The Podcast on Apple Podcasts, SpreakerSpotify, Tunein, Podcast Addict, Google Podcasts, and everywhere else you listen to podcasts. Also, make sure to like our Facebook page!

Please make sure to rate, review, share, and subscribe! Thanks!

Jay and Mark are joined by Will Slater (of the Exploding Helicopter Podcast) to discuss “Crash and Burn,” the 12th chapter on the Deep Blue Sea DVD. In this episode, they discuss juicy explosions, exploding helicopters, and the geography of the Aquatica

Please rate, review, share and subscribe!

Make sure to follow Exploding Helicopter on Twitter (@chopperfireball), Facebook, and Instagram.

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